Queen Anne’s Lace

Love the details in this picture
Love the details in this picture

Enjoying a afternoon by the water front in Barrie, Ontario.

(Einen schönen Nachmittag am See in Berrie, Ontario)

 

Love, Love, love this picture...
Love, Love, love this picture…

Queen Anne’s Lace

 

 

Decided to bring my camera and my Macro lens.

(Meine Kamera kommt fast überal mit)

 

2014-07-21 19.34.05

Just love to take pictures close up.

Enjoy and have a wonderful week

Eine wunderschöne Woche wünsch ich Euch allen 

Abundance of flowers all on one stem
Abundance of flowers all on one stem
I am always surprised to see all the little insects that sneak into my pictures
I am always surprised to see all the little insects that sneak into my pictures
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Spider in it’s Web

Wonderful sight

This was so great I was able to go to one inch up to this Spider that had made this awesome web between two Junipers in our backyard, every day we, the kids and I had a chance to see what this amazing Spider was up to.  Sometimes it was hiding in the Juniper waiting for some action.  This time it was I believe feeding on a bug.  It was interesting depends from what side I approached this Spider it would see me and move back to its hiding spot.  If I came toward it from his top it would not move so I can only think it did not see me and I was so happy to get these beautiful pictures so close up.

“Spider, Spider what do you see

Not me………

Come closer so I see you

Let me look at you ……ohhhh so beautiful what a delicate web

Just look, don’t touch,

 I will take care of you…..just look

I’ll be good to you”

By Jacqueline Grice

Parasitoid Wasp

Parasitoid Wasp

This Wasp decided to take a rest on our house wall this summer.  What a site that was, no idea what this insect was.  Will it sting us with his big long tail?  Get the camera quickly…..take a picture and lets find out what it is?!

          Luckily we have a great book that showed exactly that Insect “Parasitoid Wasp”

          From what we read this Wasp is one of the most beneficial species that inhabit our gardens.  The females walk along tree trunks until they sense a vibration of a boring beetle within. Then, with extreme precision, the females acrobatically curl their abdomen, coil their long ovipositor and drive it through the bark and the inner wood, directly into the unsuspecting larva.  After laying an egg, the females pull out their ovipositor and continue hunting.

The weakened caterpillars become a buffet for the hunting wasp larva, which grows and feeds on the non-vital tissues first, saving the organs far last.